2009 to 2014: Not More of the Same Please

After the last elections, a report announced that: “2009 turned out to be a watershed year for Indian politics with Congress’ good showing in the Lok Sabha polls.”
Sunil Gatade, thought that the results marked the, “Rise of Congress, further decline of BJP and the relegation of the Left and some regional parties to the margins.”
He even thought “price rise” was going to prove a challenge, along with the naxal problem and cross-border terrorism.
Indeed: “the Congress tally of over 200 in the 543-member Lok Sabha, 50 seats more than it got in 2004, surprised even many a Congressman.” But the summer of 2014 might tell a completely different story for India’s grand old party.

Parliament_PTI

There is no Third Front led by CPI(M) General Secretary Prakash Karat. But there sure is a Arvind Kejriwal-led Aam Admi Party, almost behaving like the proverbial “bull in china shop”.
The BJP’s “tally in the Lok Sabha reduced from 138 to 116,” but if predictions are anything to go by, the saffron party is all set to change that with Narendra Modi at the helm.
One record the 15th Lok Sabha set was that it had the Highest number of women MPs (http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/article120449.ece) – 59 in all. The Congress had 23 MPs, followed by 13 from the BJP.
The number of women who contested in 2009 was 556.
The 15th Lok Sabha has another distinction that might be more dubious than progressive: in the 14th Lok Sabha there were 156 crorepatis, but that rose by a whopping 102 per cent in 15th.
This cross-party prosperity index surely is one big reason why politicians as a class have come to be regarded quite shabbily by the chatterati.

Also Read:
MPs: Crorepatis or underpaid public servants?

 

PRS Legislative Research

PRS Legislative Research

PRS Legislative Research

PRS Legislative Research

PRS Legislative Research

PRS Legislative Research

Data from PRS Legislative Research

Data from PRS Legislative Research